Famous Last Words · Political · Washington DC

FLW: John Quincy Adams, content in death

Famous Last Words John Quincy Adams Washington, D. C. February 23, 1848 "This is the last of Earth. I am content." John Quincy Adams was the sixth president of the United States and long-time opponent of slavery and advocate of science. Adams never retired after his presidency and remained in Congress, even after he suffered… Continue reading FLW: John Quincy Adams, content in death

Executions · Germany · Political

Three young people executed in Nazi Germans for distribution of anti-Nazi publication

February 22, 1943 Munich, Germany Siblings Hans (left) and Sophie Scholl and their friend Christoph Probst (right) are executed for high treason Hans Scholl had been a member of the Hitler Youth but became disillusioned after witnessing what the Nazi Party actually stood for. He saw firsthand the treatment of the Jews in Poland and… Continue reading Three young people executed in Nazi Germans for distribution of anti-Nazi publication

Executions · Famous Last Words · Italy · Political

FLW: “how badly you shoot”

Famous Last Words Andreas Hofer Mantua, Italy February 20, 1810 “Ah, how badly you shoot.” Hofer, a leader of a rebellion against Napoleon, was captured and court marshaled. An order was issued stating to “give him a fair trial and then shoot him,” which was carried out. Hofer reportedly gave money to the corporal in… Continue reading FLW: “how badly you shoot”

Executions · Iraq · Political

Caliph executed by starvation, told to “eat (his) treasure”

February 20, 1258 Baghdad, Iraq Caliph Al-Musta'sim Billah is executed by invading Mongolian forces According to The Travels of Marco Polo, Al-Musta'sim was locked in his treasure room without food or water, sentenced to die by dehydration or starvation. As he was imprisoned, Mongolian leader Hulagu Khan (grandson of Genghis Khan) reportedly said “eat of… Continue reading Caliph executed by starvation, told to “eat (his) treasure”

Political · Washington DC

Unfaithful congressman acquitted of killing district attorney for having an affair with his wife (1859)

February 19, 1859 Washington, DC Congressman Daniel E. Sickles is acquitted of murder due to a temporary insanity defense, the first time in US history this defense was used successfully Sickles — who had been having a very public affair with a known prostitute, including taking her on vacation to England while his pregnant wife… Continue reading Unfaithful congressman acquitted of killing district attorney for having an affair with his wife (1859)